Wild Orca operating under NMFS permit 26288.

Eba.  A simple name, for a small dog with an immeasurable purpose.

Traditionally, the name Eba means “life.” However, neither this name—chosen by Giles simply because she liked it—nor Eba’s future as a whale scientist were at all intentional.  In fact, Giles did not even plan to have another dog after a previous loss, and so when she met Eba, she couldn’t have imagined that the little dog would become such an essential part of her work as a killer whale scientist. Everything about Eba and her new-found career are serendipitous, at the very least.

So how did Eba find both Giles and her calling?  Well, it all started when a tiny 3.5 pound puppy wandering the streets of Sacramento was taken to a shelter, chilled to the bone, but a fighter, nonetheless. Once healthy, she was placed with a foster family. Then as chance would have it, through a series of fortunate mishaps, she was adopted by none other than Giles’ sister! She later asked Giles if she would take her, due to the dynamic with her other dogs.  Giles was hesitant, but she found the lovable personality impossible to refuse, so she took her home to San Juan Island, telling herself it was only on a trial basis. We all know how that turned out!

Giles quickly found that the newly-named Eba had high energy and intelligence, but also a high play drive—the perfect recipe for a scent sniffing science dog!  She preferred playing above eating and would pursue anyone who was willing to throw a ball, over and over and over.  In fact, Giles has found in Eba a doggy detective with all the right traits!  Despite being cautioned in the past that companion dogs don’t often make good scent dogs, Eba is a natural, having mastered the skill in only four days!  Today her favorite toy is a rope, and her game of choice is tug of war, which is her reward every time she helps the team find whale poop!

As you can see, this small, yet mighty dog—now weighing in at 30 pounds—is providing a huge benefit with her scent detection skills, the enormity of which she will never know.  All Eba wants out of life is to greet literally everyone she meets by wagging her entire body, to snuggle up with Jim and Giles, to play with her favorite toys and smell that salty Salish Sea air from the bow of a research boat.  And if there’s whale poop out there too?  Well that’s just a perk of the job!

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Endangered Killer Whales

U.S. must mirror Canada’s bold plan to save endangered orcas

Canada has a bold new plan to try to save Pacific salmon from extinction, which would also help safeguard a future for the endangered Southern Resident killer whales. What's the catch? Without a U.S. plan, how can they succeed?

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U.S. must mirror Canada’s bold plan to save endangered orcas

Canada has a bold new plan to try to save Pacific salmon from extinction, which would also help safeguard a future for the endangered Southern Resident killer whales. What's the catch? Without a U.S. plan, how can they succeed?

Act Now

Action Guide

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